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Explore PopAtomic Studios

PopAtomic Studios is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization working to change negative misconceptions about atomic energy by creating new imagery and sharing current information. We are a group of artists working to support clean and contemporary nuclear energy solutions. Our goals include:

*Creating new imagery and icons that invite viewers to further investigate nuclear energy as a solution to the energy, environmental and economic issues we are facing today.
*Providing Atomic inspired designs and public artwork for Individuals, Student Groups, Energy Companies and other proponents of nuclear energy.

*Creating fun and engaging educational materials for all ages to promote the benefits of new nuclear technologies and the future of clean energy.

Please get in touch with us regarding any ideas or questions you might have! We are excited to create custom artwork specific to your needs!

The Problem with the Electric Car

Electric Vehicles- Too Good to be True?

In recent months Nissan has begun effective marketing of their new Zero-Emissions vehicle the Leaf. According to the Nissan website, Zero-emissions are eco-friendly vehicles, such as Electric Vehicles (EVs) and Fuel-Cell Vehicles (FCVs) that have no tailpipe emissions of CO2 or other gases. The idea is that you can charge the vehicle’s electric battery at home or at designated charging stations and have absolutely no carbon emissions, or at least that is what the advertising might lead one to believe. Sounds pretty great but there is one major problem that the media and public don’t seem to notice. Electricity is not intrinsically carbon-free. In fact, electricity production is the single largest emitter of CO2 in the United States according to the EPAs report on Climate Change.

I have often wondered why culturally, the idea of electricity is not associated with large carbon emissions? I think it probably has something to do with the big bucks spent by the Coal Industry on advertising, but regardless, I would like to think that as Americans we are smart enough to recognize their deceit.  And Coal is exactly what is fueling the new Nissan Leaf, and other hybrids and Fuel-Cell Vehicles. Essentially cars like the Leaf are just deferring their CO2 emissions to another fossil fuel.

I see this issue as tangible evidence of the lack of general understanding of energy production and consumption. I agree that electricity is good. I like having lights, heat, hospitals, schools, computers, and cars. However, we must be more critical of where our electricity is coming from and drop the assumption that electric=clean. This new generation of electric vehicles could be a great thing, but it depends on a large scale shift to a clean energy source: nuclear energy.

Building Tomorrow’s Work Force by Sharing a Piece of Nuclear History

PopAtomic Studios in partnership with the Michael Krupinski Memorial Foundation launched an exciting new fund-raising project this past week in Amelia Island at the 22nd Annual Waste Management and Clean-Up Decision Makers Forum. We unveiled these custom made sculptures displaying graphite salvaged from the very first man-made sustained nuclear reaction at Stagg Field in Chicago on December 2, 1942.

These little pieces of history are available for a charitable donation ranging from $200 to $500 and the proceeds from the sculptures is going to the Michael Krupinski Memorial Foundation (MKMF). MKMF is an effort to expand the pipeline of students entering the engineering field to support the growth of the nuclear industry’s workforce. They do this through real-time interactive reactor lab sessions that are done live via the internet using cameras in classrooms across America. We encourage you to learn more about their work and share this exciting project with anyone who might be interested in supporting this important cause.

You can see in the drawing of the Chicago Pile 1 that this graphite moderator was stacked with the Uranium in the first nuclear reaction, calculated and overseen by Enrico Fermi himself. This is such an incredible part of human history and we include a booklet with the complete history of CP-1 as well as a certificate of authenticity with each sculpture order.

There is a limited supply of this historical graphite, however, I wanted to open up this opportunity to supporters of PopAtomic since our readers tend to be good Samaritans and champions of education. We are very excited to contribute to the growth of the MKMFs outreach efforts and consider them a close ally in our efforts to cultivate a better public understanding of nuclear energy.

If you are interested in having your own piece of history and supporting the growth of America’s nuclear workforce please contact us via email for an order form for your custom sculpture: radioactiveart@popatomic.org.

The Beginning of my Nuclear Education

In 1999, during a lesson about energy and ecology in my high school Biology class (in Atlanta) I was taught that nuclear energy was intrinsically dangerous and hazardous to the environment. I went home that day incredibly upset and confronted my Dad, a Nuclear Engineer, about all of the horrible things he had been doing at work and voiced my disappointment in his choice of career. My Dad didnt say anything, he just listened. The next day he went to Georgia Tech and borrowed a Geiger Counter. When I came home from school that afternoon, he had assembled a number of everyday items on the kitchen table. He explained that radiation is all around us and showed me that some things in our home have measureable amounts of radioactivity. I remember one item was a lantern mantel (which contained thorium at that time), which pegged the meter. He asked if I would like to go and investigate a nuclear power plant so that I could report back to my class with more information about nuclear energy and radiation.

That weekend we drove up to the Oconee Power Station in South Carolina, Geiger Counter in hand, to measure the radiation levels at the plant. During the drive, my Dad discussed all the measures that utilities take to protect workers, the public, and the environment from the radiation inside the reactor.  He told me about the r-squared effect, and that I could expect to find the highest radiation measurements nearest the containment building, and it would decline exponentially the further away we went.

This was before the September 11th attacks, and I was able to get really close to the structures, and my research was enthusiastically supported by the staff at the Oconee Power Station (they have a great Visitors Center if you ever have a chance to visit). We took readings at three distances starting near the containment building, then moving outward. We did the same thing at the spent fuel storage facility. The measurements were really, really low near the facilities and declined rapidly as we moved away from each building.  On the closest public road to site, the radiation level was the same as the background reading far from the site.